[an error occurred while processing this directive] Gramma's Walk was our last Five in A Row book study. After several wonderful years our studies came to a bittersweet close. We were moving on to Beyond Five In A Row but leaving behind many wonderful memories of our Five In A Row studies.

Several fun things that we incorporated into our Gramma's Walk lapbook were creating a pocket to hold sequence cards of the story. The boys illustrated and colored pictures of various parts of the story, then we laminated them and put them in a pocket in the lapbook. They then were able to recreate the story and thus imprint its memory in their minds. This was one of the instructional steps in the FIAR study manual.

A great idea we had was to get the boy's grandmother (my mom) to write a story for them about her childhood. "Memaw" wrote a wonderful little story and then I printed it in a small book form, laminating a reduced size color copy of Gramma's Walk on the cover. We made a small drinking cup pocket for it to sit in. It is a very sweet and a wonderful memory for the boys to cherish

For the science portion of the study we utilized a tab top form to display all the senses. On each page of the tab book the boys illustrated and demonstrated various information on the senses.

The grammar study was about compound words. For this we used a shutter fold. On the left side of the outside of shutter fold the boys pasted a picture of the first portion of a compound word (ex: shell). On the right side they pasted the last portion of the compound word (ex:fish). The outside would then read (in picture form) shellfish. Inside the shutter fold each word was spelled out by the boys.

Since the book did not give a specific place in which the story took place, we decided that the northern coast of Washington state looked very much like the beach in the story. So, for geography, the boys read about and illustrated the state bird, tree, flag and map.

The math study for this book was multiplication. We used the matchbook form to learn the times tables. The boys really loved learning their times tables this way and used the posters we made many times there after.

We also utilized a pinwheel type form from Dinah Zike's Big Book of Books to illustrate the various reasons for lighthouses. A tri-level form compares and contrasts the three large bodies of water that surround the U.S.: Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and the Gulf Of Mexico.

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